Video

Strategies for Working with NGS Testing on Site in China

Did you know that NGS testing in China can be can be expedited with the right site relationships? 

As treatment options move towards enhanced personalization, NGS testing, or specific gene mutation testing, has become increasingly common as part of modern oncology and hematology clinical trials. When PSI Shanghai was contacted about a specific oncology trial requiring NGS testing, the team was able to contact 24 sites with relevant indication experience, and within 3 days, received interest from 15 of those sites to participate. 

In order to accelerate patient enrollment, PSI engages a trusted network of highly qualified sites to ensure that each trial’s needs are met with specific experience. Learn more about NGS testing in China with Lisa Lu, Country Manager.

If you have a phase 2/3 clinical trial requiring NGS testing, consider clinical trial sites in China. Around the world, PSI CRO is working to ensure studies deliver on time and on budget. Discover more about our oncology and hematology experience here or contact us to speak with an expert today.

Transcript:

Did you know the NGS testing status in China?
Modern Oncology and hematology trials often require specific mutation testing, as we all move to a more personalized
medicine in time.
While this NGS technology is well established in China, it is not used in every study yet.
We still have capacity here. Let me share with you some recent cases.
We recently had a request for a specific oncology trial to be run in China. The protocol required sites being able to run the
NGS testing in screening phase. PSI’s Shanghai team contacted 24 sites with study experience in this indication.
Overall, the sites’ attitude was positive.We only had 3 days to check our sites. Among all of them, 15 sites expressed immediate interest and had the relevant
NGS experience and equipment.
The results show that NGS testing is not a show stopper for any modern trials which need this measured in China.
Looking forward to seeing you in Shanghai.

Strategies for Expediting Study Startup in Australia With Barrie Koh

Did you know that Phase 2 and 3 study startup times in Australia can be expedited with the right site relationships? In order to accelerate the first patient in, PSI engages private sites and medical centers to ensure an average startup timeline of only five months. Learn more about study startup in Australia with Barrie Koh, Country Manager.

Around the world, PSI CRO is working to ensure studies deliver on time and on budget. Find the nearest office to you and start a conversation.

Transcript:

Hi, I’m Barrie. Did you know that Australia is quick to start up?

Everyone in the industry knows that it is easy to get an approval for an early-phase study in Australia. It is supported by streamlined regulatory processes, and you just need fewer documents for submissions. What most don’t realize is that startup in Phase 2 and Phase 3 isn’t that different.

The challenge is that most clients have a habit of going back to the same key opinion leaders or the huge institutions. they have lots of studies and they are heavily bureaucratic. To get to the first patient in quickly, PSI has been engaging the private sites, which are much more agile, only working with four to five huge private medical centers and a dozen more smaller sites.

With this particular approach, five months is feasible and it is consistent across all phases, all therapeutic areas and drugs classes. To cite you an example, in a recent microbiome study, we actually managed to achieve the first patient in in five and a half months at a private site down in Sunshine Coast. And this came in two weeks ahead of our planned first patient in.

Another example is a gene therapy study that we’re currently running. We were the first CRO to apply for a gene therapy license (in Australia). So we actually worked with each other to try to move this forward and this was done under four months itself and ever since then, we’ve completed four more gene therapy studies.

How to Apply for Phase 1 and Phase 3 Studies in China at the Same Time With Lisa Lu

Did you know you may be able to run Phase 1 and Phase 3 studies in China in parallel, particularly for urgent medical needs?

Hear Lisa Lu, PSI CRO’s Country Manager in China, discuss how to determine if your study may qualify and how PSI’s local experts can help.

Around the world, PSI CRO is working to ensure studies deliver on time and on budget. Find the nearest office to you and start a conversation.

Transcript:

Hello, my name is Lisa Lu. I’m the country manager for PSI in China and I’m located in Shanghai. Let me share with you some relevant aspects for running clinical trials in China.

Did you know that for new drugs coming to China, it is needed to conduct a PK study in a Chinese population locally? One can apply for an IND for Phase 1 and Phase 3 studies at the same time.

Based on NMPA’s feedback, you can potentially run Phase 1 and Phase 3 studies in parallel. Urgent medical needs like hematology studies, and lethal diseases without any drugs available at the moment, have a higher chance in running Phase 1 and 3 studies at the same time.

Usually, a PK study needs 20 to 30 healthy volunteer subjects or patients, depending on the different indication and medicine.

How Do India Study Startup Timelines Compare? With Radhika Bobba

How did we achieve site activation for a radiopharmaceutical study in India in less than 5 months? It turns out India study startup timelines are faster than many European countries.

Learn more in this video with Radhika Bobba, PSI CRO’s Regional Director, India and Far East Country Management.

Around the world, PSI CRO is working to ensure studies deliver on time and on budget. Find the nearest office to you and start a conversation.

Transcript:

India startup timelines are always discussed. “India is so slow, it’s so difficult to set up a study, it’s so difficult to start a study.” Let me give you a recent example.

We submitted a dossier for a radiopharmaceutical molecule in oncology on the 3rd of August, 2021. We received approval for this particular dossier on the 2nd of December, 2021 from a regulatory authority, the DCGI. It took us five months. The first site was initiated on the 14th of December, 2021, and the same site was activated on the 28th of December, 2021.

5 months, is it so long?

Yes, we are definitely not the fastest. We are definitely not the slowest. We can be compared to other countries in Europe. We can be compared to France, Italy, Germany, Switzerland. We are faster than Romania.

Debunking Latin American Study Startup Myths With Oscar Podesta

Did you know that startup timelines for some countries in Latin America are comparable to those of many in Europe?

Hear from Oscar Podesta, PSI’s Head of Latin America, as he shares insights debunking some of the common myths about startup duration in the region.

Around the world, PSI CRO is working to ensure studies deliver on time and on budget. Find the nearest office to you and start a conversation.

Transcript:

Hi, my name is Oscar Podesta. I’ve been responsible for the Latin American region at PSI for almost 10 years now, and I wanted to briefly address one of the most frequent comments I receive about my countries here that is related to the startup timelines.

I think that these days we can call it a myth around Latin American countries being too slow to get started in clinical research trials, but I do remember those years where this was true—I mean when Latin American countries used to take just too long to get activated, but that’s not the case anymore, and it has not been the case for quite some time already.

These days, if you look only at statutory timelines, we can say that countries like Panama or Chile can be activated in less than six months, which is comparable in line with many countries in Europe. And even looking at bigger countries, like Argentina, for instance, our statutory timelines there are comparable with Germany, actually could be even shorter than the UK.

So, looking at overall just First Site Activated in countries in the region, our timelines are not longer than the rest of the world in general. But I think we have to look at that in more detail. And if we look at the data we have at PSI, our track record and metrics, and we actually look at the average time to activate all sites in a country—not just the first site activated, but all sites—that provides even more interesting information.

At the end of the day, we need all sites activated to make the enrollment for the study, so it is important to have the whole country active. And looking at those data at PSI, we find out that countries like Argentina, Chile, Panama, and Peru are actually shorter than several western European countries.

And let’s take another step into that and look at the bigger countries in the region, like Brazil or Mexico. Brazil right now is hitting more than 200 million people living there. So it’s huge, as everybody knows. And historically, everybody would say, “No, I wouldn’t go with the study to Brazil because it takes too long”—and it’s not the case. It’s not the case.

Right now there are a lot of indications, especially rare diseases, that are branded fast-track review by the authorities in Brazil, and a rare disease study can easily be activated in Brazil, maybe in six months, which puts the country in direct competition to pretty much any country in the world. So, the myth or the statement about Latin American countries being too slow, I don’t think it’s anymore not even fair to say.

Case Study: Delivering a Global Pivotal, Phase 3 Trial in 2020

Design: Adaptive, Randomized, Double-blind, Double-dummy, Prospective Trial 

Phase: III 

Drug Class: Antibiotic 

Indication: Complicated urinary tract infection (cUTI)

Geography: 15 countries across three continents: USA, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Estonia, Georgia, Hungary, Latvia, Moldova, Poland, Romania, Russia, Serbia, Slovakia, Ukraine, South Africa 

Sites: 101 sites, more than 95% enrolled patients 

Simply put, delivering trials is what we do. It’s our expertise – it’s what we’re dedicated to, and it’s what our teams are built for. But, not so simple, is the trial itself. In fact, when has an Adaptive, Randomized, Double-blind, Double-dummy, Prospective Trial been easy? When has a pivotal, phase 3 program been defined as “simple” by any means?

At PSI, we can do hard things. And that’s how we ran this study in 15 countries, across 3 continents, at more than 100+ sites. Take a look at the video below to learn more about the study, and see the hidden dimensions behind what it takes to enroll.


We completed enrollment on time, with Last Patient In (LPI) occurring during the peak of the first COVID-19 wave. Because PSI invests significant time and resources to build close site relationships, our CRAs are considered as ambassadors of the sites – they go further than what is typical across the industry. This means that sites want to work with PSI, they prioritize our studies, and we understand their preferred methods of working. In turn, we’re able to complete enrollment on-time, even in the midst of a global pandemic.

We Can Do Hard Things

PSI enrolled the described trial at a rate 23% higher than industry metrics in the same indication, while achieving all key milestones on schedule.

To say that this wasn’t easy would be an understatement.  Where did anyone see an easy phase III trial lately:  timelines slip, vendors get acquired, standards of care change, interest dwindles, competition doesn’t stand still…the list goes on and on.  These studies are meticulous, and require a great amount of time and attention. 

Making the Difference: The Right Team

It takes an inordinate amount of dedication, uncommon commitment to owning contractual promises and a team that’s stable, dependable and focused on the right things at the right time.  Do you want to work with a team like that?

Contact us today to discuss your pivotal trial needs!